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How To Transfer Domain Names

Transferring a domain from one registrar to another continues to be a frustrating task for many people so if you are one of them, here is a quick guide and check-list to avoid hassles next time you need to change registrars.

This quick guide refers mainly to transfering popular generic top level domains: .COM, .NET, .ORG, .BIZ, and .INFO. If you want to transfer a country domain you should check for instructions with your current registrar or with the registry's web site.

The main thing is to run through these 6 steps BEFORE you even start a domain transfer request. That way you will eliminate virtually all the hassle areas before you begin:

1. Was my domain registered or renewed less than 60 days ago?
If yes, your current registrar will almost certainly refuse a transfer. You should wait until 60 days have past before requesting transfer to another registrar. Read my tips and reasons for the 60 day domain transfer rule.

2. Is there any unresolved dispute concerning my domain?
If so, don't waste your time requesting a transfer. Your current registrar won't allow a transfer until the dispute has been resolved.

3. Has my domain expired? Is it about to expire?
If your domain name has expired it cannot be transferred. You'll first need to restore it at your current registrar. If your domain has less than 10 days to go before expiry it is risky to try a transfer because the process can take about a week to complete during which time the domain may expire. Read my other post with tips on how to do transfer domain names without tears!

4. Is my domain's administrative contact email address up to date? And are there any spam filters?
This is crucial because when you request your transfer your new registrar will email the Admin Contact for your domain at the email address in the WHOIS database. You must respond to that email to confirm your transfer request. But if your admin contact email address is out of date or if you or your ISP have spam filters attached, you won't receive the message. Obviously if you don't receive the email you won't be able to respond, so this step really is essential!

5. Is my domain unlocked?
Login to your domain account at your current registrar and make sure that your domain is not locked. You should check this even if you unlocked it a while ago. This is because some registrars have the Domain Lock feature automatically revert to "locked" mode a week or so after you unlock it.

6. Is the domain I want to transfer .ORG, .INFO or .BIZ?
If yes, you need to obtain an Authorisation Code from your current registrar. Your new registrar will ask you for this authorisation code when you request your domain transfer. You can usually obtain this code from a link in your current domain account. If not, you will need to email your current registrar and request the authorization code.


Are you done with these 6 steps? Ok, you should now be all set to have your domain transfer without a hitch.

Just click the domain transfer link at your new registrar and off you go!

And if you would like to transfer your domains to one of my registration services, here are the links:
Transfers from only $7.75 at 1stDomainNameServices.com

Bulk Transfers (10 or more) from only $9.95 at CheapToRegister.com

Bulk Transfers (10 or more) from only $9.95 at DomainsNow4U.com About The Author - Copyright © Fred Bunzl - All Rights Reserved. Fred Bunzl has more than four year's experience in the domain name business, being partnered with three of the Web's largest ICANN accredited domain name registrars through his sites: DomainsNow4U.com®, CheapToRegister.com and 1stDomainNameServices.com. Fred is a member of the International Council of Online Professionals, i-cop.org, dedicated to promoting online business ethics and integrity. For more information about Fred Bunzl's services, visit http://www.domainregistrationtips.info This article may be reproduced provided that it complete content and author by-lines are kept intact and unchanged. Hyperlinks and/or URLs must remain both human clickable and search engine spiderable.

Fred Bunzl