Google



HOME PAGE



 

 


Working At Home...Should It Be A Job Or A Business?


You have decided to work at home (either by choice or necessity) and now you are faced with the decision as to whether to pursue a work at home job or to start a home based business. That may sound like a minor distinction, but the differences can be significant.

A general psychological characterization of the entrepreneurial spirit, says they are typically people who have a high energy level, set long-term goals, feel quite self-confident, and view money and financial security as a measure of accomplishment and piece of mind.

They are further characterized as problem solvers, who take risks, learn from their failures (as well as those of others), accept personal responsibility, seize the initiative, and use all available resources to achieve their success.

Entrepreneurs compete with themselves and believe that success or failure lies within their personal control or influence. They do not see setbacks as failures, but rather as learning experiences. Most of all, they exhibit persistence and tenacity, never giving up and never quitting the quest for success.

If you fit most of these criteria, you would probably elect to start a home business instead of undertaking a work at home job.

However, the decision to work at home does not necessarily mean that you want to be the owner of a business. You may prefer working at home for an already established company. This is often easier to do than owning a business yourself and you may not want all the headaches, responsibilities and obligations that come with owning your own business.

Regardless of which path (job or business) you choose, the first step is to figure out what business or work-from-home opportunity you want to pursue. There are many excellent information sources such as public libraries and Internet sites that list seemingly countless home business and work at home job opportunities. The abundance is so great that it might well lead to confusion.

One of the most important factors is often overlooked. This is your personal inventory. Often this will yield some direction and focus to the business or job selection process. Assess yourself and your situation. Write a resume for yourself that includes your background, education, training as well as any particular on-the-job skills you possess that could possibly be used in a venture or job. Also look at your leisure-time activities and hobbies, because many businesses result from a person following their "passion." Ask yourself how much time you can realistically put into a business venture, given your present commitments.

Once you have determined the general type of home business or work at home job that you want to undertake, it is of critical importance that you do your homework (research) to select the specific opportunity where you are going to make your “investment” (some combination of time, effort and money) in working at home.

Kirk Bannerman operates a successful home based business and resides in California. For more details, visit his website at http://business-at-home.us

Kirk Bannerman