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Dog Training Basics

All positive commands should be spoken sharply and distinctly during training. Make sure you also use a positive tone. Your dog will recognize your moods and associate them to their behavior by your tone of voice.

The first word the puppy should learn is their name. They actually learn the sound of their name and associate that as a directive towards them for their attention. This will come naturally over time since the family will be calling the pup by its name the day it arrives in your home.

I suggest that before you start training verbal commands that you understand your puppy’s personality. Ask yourself if they are timid, aggressive, quiet, sensitive, playful, etc? These traits will affect the type and speed of the training with your dog. Understanding the dog that is being trained is a vitally important talent of a good trainer.

As soon as you are able to touch and feel the puppy, call them by their name. Constantly give them affection and praise with the tone of your voice. Keep repeating their name over and over and over until the pup understands that when they hear their name, it is addressing them. When you prepare meals for them, call them by name and then distinctly say the word “come.” This is probably the simplest and easiest commands to teach because it is associated with something the puppy wants or gets excited when they hear that command. This theory and type of training is used in all the generic commands. Remember to always keep praising them when they obey a command and make sure they feel rewarded.

House breaking a puppy is probably the most stressful for a new trainer. However, the good news is that most dogs are generally clean in nature and sense that the house is not the place to do their thing. Knowing that canines tend to have their bowel movements in the same place that they or some other dogs have previously defecated, you need to understand that the sent left behind from previous mistakes will signal to the pup that is where they are supposed to be defecating. So when you do catch them doing something in the house that you do not want, scold them in a simple command such as “shame.” The puppy will hear your tone of voice and feel bad. Usher them outside as fast as you can. Praise them when they defecate outside. Do not use the command “no” since that is a command to have the puppy stop the current act. “Shame” is used after you have found the evidence of the unwanted act. This is a common mistake a lot of armature dog trainers have.

If you have a pup that will not heed to the command “come,” do not chance them. This will only make your puppy runaway farther. Instead, when they look at you, call their name and immediately you run away from them. Soon they will be chasing you and will associate the command “come” as intended. They will come to you.

Remember this always, a puppy should only be scolded when they are caught in the act of doing something they should not be doing. Never scold a puppy when you have not caught them in the act. Use the command “shame” when looking at the evidence but do not look at the dog when vocalizing this. Over time, they will associate the command “shame” with your disapproval mood. They may never associate it to their act unless you catch them in it. Leave it at that. No other scolding will help, in fact it will do just the opposite. It will make the puppy loose trust in you rather than want to correct their error because they do not associate the act with your mood and commands.

If you find this article useful, please visit the site http://www.the-german-shepard-dog.com where you can find other useful information on the German Shepherd and all other canines.

About the Author

Please visit http://www.the-german-shepard-dog.com for more information and other articles written by Robert Kempe.

Robert Kempe