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Genes and Work Ethic


If you have good genes, you are blessed. If they are exceptional, you might be successful on that alone.

Add work ethic and you will be successful and remarkable.

On Thursday, Sept. 9, 2004, Linda Green retired after 23 years as a dancer in “Jubilee!” the longest-running production of its kind in Las Vegas.

At 51, Green was the oldest continually working showgirl.

A local columnist dubbed her the “Cal Ripkin Jr. of showgirls,” after baseball’s record holder for most consecutive games played.

In certain respects, her achievement is more remarkable.

In her profession, where a 15-year career is unusual, Green has auditioned ever six months to keep her job. She kept that job despite her competition of 18 and 19-year-olds.

Yet, at 5’10”, and 130 lbs. for decades, she is still graceful and stunning.

In part, she credits her longevity to “good genes,” remarking, “I’m Scandinavian.” But that’s where genetics ends and Linda Green begins.

The show’s associate producer credits Green with being “the utmost professional.”

Green is "highly trained technically and she has an absolutely marvelous work ethic," says Fluff Le Coque, the show’s associate producer.

“She loves it, and that's what shows. That's what you see across the footlights. She really loves what she's doing."

A dancer half her age would find Green’s daily routine of exercise and stretching demanding, but that’s why she has defied the calendar for so long.

Most of us were not born with such genetic predisposition for what we do. Regardless, no one is born with work ethic.

And this is where we can follow Green’s example.

Love what you do. Train at it everyday. Perfect your technique. Aspire to the highest professional standards and prepare yourself accordingly.

It will make up for any lack of genes.

Copyright 2004 by Tony Papajohn.

Tony writes and speaks on success. Subscribe to his free SuccessMotivator e-zine at http://www.successmotivator.com.


tony@successmotivator.com

Tony Papajohn