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Garden Arrangements can make a huge difference in your yard

Gardening is a very popular hobby, and one that can be enjoyed by young or old, whole families, someone employed outside the home, and those who are self-employed or stay-at-home parents.



Getting outside into the fresh air, and exercising your creativity on floral, herb and vegetable gardens is not only healthy, but will bring pleasure to your family and visitors. Whether you devote hours every day to your efforts, or concentrate all your talents on weekend binges of planting and weeding, it’s possible to create just the look you want, from old English country gardens, to the carefully organized “wild” look.



The first thing you’ll need to consider before starting on a grand plan for revamping your yard, is the type of soil. If you don’t know what you have, for example the level of acidity, check with your local garden center for test kits before investing in plants and bushes that won’t thrive in what you can offer them. Once you know what you’re working with, you can go ahead and decide what to plant, and how you want your gardens laid out.



No matter what the topography of your yard, e.g. completely flat, dotted with trees, undulating, or sloped, you can find just the right plants to brighten up a dark corner, or fill in a bare space.



Areas which get a lot of shade are often dark, but that doesn’t mean they have to be dull. This can be a great place to install an in-the-ground lined pond for goldfish. Or how about a rock garden, and let the kids help you collect the rocks that will elevate the level of the plants, and give it that “natural” look. For a touch of the whimsical, place something like a bear figurine with a gazing ball, right in the center, where it will be the focus of attention.



Wide open spaces, such as along the edge of a lawn or yard, are the perfect place to plant a large, “graduated” garden in the shape that fits the surrounding area, including wedges, ovals, and long rectangles. Depending on the shape, and the amount of space, you’ll have lots of scope to create a multi-level riot of color. If the garden faces the house, you’ll want to plant your longer flowers to the rear, and then “step down” in size to border plants. With ovals and circles that can be appreciated from all sides, the taller plants should go in the center, and work your way to the shortest ones from the center, outwards.



These larger, display gardens are the perfect place to put focal decorations such as birdbaths, or sundials. In a smaller garden, one bird bath would be sufficient, but in a long strip garden, one near each end, with perhaps a sun dial in the center, will make an outstanding display.



Gardens that are closer to the house, and which are seen from the windows, are usually where people choose to add those extra special touches. An herb garden that gives off delightful scents in summer, is made more charming with flat garden stones placed at intervals. These come with pictures, mottos, quotations and even Bible verses.



Another highly popular item to tuck in amongst the blossoms, are decorative figurines. The durable construction in long-lasting vinyl or alabastrite, offers years of enjoyment from squirrels, rabbits, fairies, and the always amusing, gnomes.



You can also extend your outside décor from the house to the garden, by matching garden flags to the design of flags you have mounted in brackets on your home. These come in seasonal and holiday designs, and can be part of an overall theme that would include things like a lady bug house flag, garden flags, garden stones, and key hider!



Imagination is the only key you’ll need to designing a garden that will enhance your property and be a pleasure to work in. When you’re done, make time to sit back and enjoy what you’ve created.

About the Author

Johann Erickson is the owner of Online Discount Mart and TV Products 4 Less. He is also a contributing writer for sites such as Helpful Home Ideas. Please include an active link to our site if you'd like to reprint this article.

Johann Erickson