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How To Win Your Case For Social Security Disability Benefits If You Suffer From Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia

Winning a Social Security Disability case for someone who suffers from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia (CFS/FMS) can be very difficult. However, with proper preparation I am often able to win client's their Social Security Disability benefits. I approach a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia case using the following five factors:

1) Was the Diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia Made by a Specialist?

I am always very skeptical on my chances of winning when a person comes to me and is not being treated by a specialist in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia. I usually prefer to see that the client is being treated by a Rheumatologist but I have been successful in these type of cases working with an Infectious Disease Specialist and a Neurologist. I feel that the diagnosis of a primary care or internist is not sufficient in this type of case. It is also important, of course, for this doctor to be supportive of his/her patientís disability case and for me and the client to know this from the beginning of my representation. If a person calls me and does not have a specialist working with him/her, I suggest that they contact a local support group for a referral.

2) Has the Clientís Doctor Eliminated Other Diseases Through Testing Before Diagnosing Him/Her with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia?

I feel that to provide validity to the diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia certain medical tests need to be performed so as to rule out other conditions. I usually like to see blood work done that excludes other Rheumatic diseases which may share symptoms with, or mimic, CFS/FMS. In cases of Fibromyalgia I look for a physical exam that finds and documents tender points. In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome cases I also normally like to see that a Tilt Table Test has been done.

3) Are the Clientís Complaints Typical For Someone Who Suffers With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia?

By now I can usually tell by interviewing a prospective client if his/her complaints are typical. The clientís medical records should show documented symptoms. Without this documentation, the diagnoses of CFS/FMS may be subject to disbelief by Social Security.

4) Was the Client Treated With Physical Therapy and/or Pain Medication?

I like to show an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) that my client has tried whatever treatment is available for his/her condition. Whether this is a series of physical therapy appointments, narcotic pain medications or even non-traditional treatments like biofeedback or acupuncture. I feel that the severity of my clientís condition will be supported by the fact that he/she has tried everything to find relief.

5) Has the Client Consulted or Been Treated by a Psychiatrist or Therapist?

Because I do not want an ALJ to attempt to say that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia are "mental disorders" I like to show the ALJ that my client is either seeking treatment for depression or anxiety or has had these conditions ruled out by a mental health specialist and are still suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia.

Sheri R. Abrams, is an Attorney who practices Social Security Disability Law in Virginia, DC and Maryland. Ms. Abrams graduated from the George Washington University Law School and the Boston University School of Management. For more information please see Ms. Abrams's web site at http://www.sheriabrams.com.


sheri@sheriabrams.com

Sheri Abrams