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Male vs Female Sexuality

In the interesting debate of Male vs Female Sexuality, can we afford to avoid the question of whether a female alternative to Viagra is needed or not?

Sex is not only necessary for the survival of the human race, it is also a major contributor to the quality of male and female life. Scientific knowledge of male sexual problems and impotence has dramatically increased, while scientific investigations concerning the sexual problems of woman has lagged behind.

The time has come when the sexual dysfunctions of women are recognized and addressed to. Pfizer tried its best to provide women with something similar to Viagra but it abandoned its efforts mid way. Procter & Gamble's effort in this field is too gone fruitless as Food and Drug Administration panel rejected Procter & Gamble's bid to market the first prescription drug for female sexual dysfunction. Other companies, sensing a possible multibillion-dollar market, are working on similar drugs.

Female Viagra wants to be similar to male Viagra, to promote certain physical responses in the body that mimic sexual arousal. According to researchers and sex counselors, 40 percent of women suffer from sexual dysfunction, treatment is challenging because much of women's sexuality takes place above the neck instead of below the waist. "They need to have some type of emotion, some type of caring shown to them," said Rutgers University professor emeritus Beverly Whipple, a neurophysiologist who named and popularized the G-spot. "They don't just have a spot rubbed and have an orgasm.". For male arousal, there is no mimicking. The p---- is hard, or it’s not. For most women desire is entwined firmly in how they feel about themselves as human, and how they feel about their partners. People have used mood-altering substances through the millenniums to get reluctant sex partners “in the mood.” Female sexual dysfunction seems to be psychologically—rather than physically—rooted.

Right now, we have tons of information available on Viagra at sites like www.viagra.com or others like http://www.viagrapunch.com where you can catch the latest headlines about Viagra. But what about female sexual dysfunction? The answer lies in the complexity of female sexuality. Viagra is designed to increase blood flow to the genitals. Viagra does the same thing for women, but that increased blood flow to the pelvic region does not, as it turns out, increase desire. For women, desire and arousal are mutually exclusive. Viagra works well for many men who suffer with impotence—or erectile dysfunction—because it's considered a physical—rather than an emotional—problem It doesn’t take a lot of effort to turn men on whereas causes of most female dysfunctions are psychological; hence, here we are talking about balancing the whole system. While Viagra-like drugs may help the 20 percent of women reported to have difficulties with lubrication (blood flow to the female genitals increase lubrication), it's unknown to what degree such drugs would help the 43 percent of women with sexual dysfunction who either say they're uninterested in sex or that sex provides little pleasure.

Even so, drug companies—banking on the success of Viagra—hope to find its female equivalent. At the moment, they are focused on developing a drug that increases blood flow to the female genitals, resulting in vaginal lubrication and relaxing vaginal muscles. So, more research is needed before we can come out with a Female Viagra which works for women.

Whether drug companies succeed, the good news is that women needn't wait for a sex pill. They have options. Research shows that exercise, counseling, vaginal lubrication products and sex videos all can help put spur a woman's libido.

In my experience, women who lack desire for sex are beset by a myriad of cultural and sociological taboos that say women who enjoy sex are whores (even if they’re married), or, if they are finished bearing children, are too old for sex. Female Viagra is eagerly awaited.

Some Female Sexual Disorder Numerical Facts

Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD) affects up to 25 percent of all American women, or an estimated 47 million women who describe their sexual dysfunction as being "unable to get turned on" or being continually uninterested in sex. Symptoms include lack of “excitement,” vaginal dryness, loss of sensation and sensitivity in the genitals and nipples, and low blood flow to the genitals. Three-fourths of women with FSAD are postmenopausal. Hormonal change and selective seratonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) anti-depressants are known sources of FSAD.

Copyright Clive - http://www.viagrapunch.com

Clive